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Poetry Collection (1,465 Books)


The World Public Library Poetry Collection shelves over 8,000 of the most popular English poems ever composed, spanning over five hundred years.

 
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Homeric Translation in Theory and Practice : A Reply to Matthew Ar...

By: Francis W. Newman ; edited by Alfred J. Drake

Victorian Literature

Excerpts: IT is so difficult, amid the press of literature, for a mere versifier and translator to gain notice at all, that an assailant may even do one a service, if he so conduct his assault as to enable the reader to sit in intelligent judgment on the merits of the book assailed. But when the critic deals out to the readers only so much knowledge as may propagate his own contempt of the book, he has undoubtedly immense power to dissuade them from wishing to open it. M...

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Marius the Epicurean : His Sensations and Ideas Volume I of Ii, 1910

By: Walter Horatio Pater ; edited by Alfred J. Drake

Victorian Literature

Excerpts: And the bridegroom, whom still she knows not, warns her thus a second time, as he talks with her by night: ?Seest thou what peril besets thee? Those cunning wolves have made ready for thee their snares, of which the sum is that they persuade thee to search into the fashion of my countenance, the seeing of which, as I have told thee often, will be the seeing of it no more for ever.

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Marius the Epicurean : His Sensations and Ideas Volume II of Ii, 1911

By: Walter Horatio Pater ; edited by Alfred J. Drake

Victorian Literature

Excerpts: It was an age, as abundant evidence shows, whose delight in rhetoric was but one result of a general susceptibility?an age not merely taking pleasure in words, but experiencing a great moral power in them. Fronto?s quaintly fashionable audience would have wept, and also assisted with their purses, had his present purpose been, as sometimes happened, the recommendation of an object of charity. As it was, arranging themselves at their ease among the images and fl...

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Marius the Epicurean : His Sensations and Ideas Volume I of Ii, 1885

By: Walter Horatio Pater ; edited by Alfred J. Drake

Victorian Literature

Excerpts: AS, in the triumph of Christianity, the old religion lingered latest in the country, and died out at last as but paganism?the religion of the villagers?before the advance of the Christian Church; so, in an earlier century, it was in places remote from town life that the older and purer forms of paganism itself had survived the longest. While, in Rome, new religions had arisen with bewildering complexity around the dying old one, the earlier and simpler patriarc...

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Marius the Epicurean : His Sensations and Ideas Volume II of Ii, 1885

By: Walter Horatio Pater ; edited by Alfred J. Drake

Victorian Literature

Excerpts: And he did this earnestly, with an outlay of all his science of mind, and that eloquence of which he was known to be a master. For Stoicism was no longer a rude and unkempt thing. Received at court, it had largely decorated itself: it had become persuasive and insinuating, and sought not only to convince men?s intelligences but to allure their souls. Associated with that fair old age of the great rhetorician and his winning voice, it was almost Epicurean. And t...

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Discourses on the Scope and Nature of University Education, 1852

By: John Henry Newman ; edited by Alfred J. Drake

Victorian Literature

Excerpts: THE view taken of a University in the Discourses which form this Volume is of the following kind: that it is a place of teaching universal knowledge. This implies that its object is, on the one hand, intellectual, not moral; and, on the other, that it is the diffusion and extension of knowledge, rather than the advancement. If its object were scientific and philosophical discovery, I do not see why a University should have students; if religious training, I do ...

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Culture and Anarchy : An Essay in Political and Social Criticism, 1869

By: Matthew Arnold ; edited by Alfred J. Drake

Victorian Literature

Excerpts: MY foremost design in writing this Preface is to address a word of exhortation to the Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge. In the essay which follows, the reader will often find Bishop Wilson quoted. To me and to the members of the Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge his name and writings are still, no doubt, familiar; but the world is fast going away from old-fashioned people of his sort, and I learnt with consternation lately from a brilliant and ...

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On Translating Homer : Last Words Matthew Arnold, 1862

By: Matthew Arnold ; edited by Alfred J. Drake

Victorian Literature

Excerpts: BUFFON, the great French, naturalist, imposed on himself the rule of steadily abstaining from all answer to attacks made upon him. ?Je n?ai jamais repondu a aucune critique,? he said to one of his friends who, on the occasion of a certain criticism, was eager to take up arms in his behalf; ?je n?ai jamais repondu a aucune critique, et je garderai le meme silence sur celle-ci.? On another occasion, when accused of plagiarism, and pressed by his friends to answer...

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On Translating Homer : Three Lectures Given at Oxford, 1861

By: Matthew Arnold ; edited by Alfred J. Drake

Victorian Literature

Excerpts: IT has more than once been suggested to me that I should translate Homer. That is a task for which I have neither the time nor the courage; but the suggestion led me to regard yet more closely a poet whom I had already long studied, and for one or two years the works of Homer were seldom out of my hands. The study of classical literature is probably on the decline; but, whatever may be the fate of this study in general, it is certain that as instruction spreads...

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The Decay of Lying : A Dialogue Oscar Wilde, January 1889

By: Oscar Wilde ; edited by Alfred J. Drake

Victorian Literature

Excerpts: Cyril (coming in through the open window from the terrace). My dear Vivian, don?t coop you up all day in the library. It is a perfectly lovely afternoon. Let us go and lie on the grass and smoke cigarettes and enjoy nature. Vivian. Enjoy nature! I am glad to say that I have entirely lost that faculty. People tell us that art makes us love nature more than we loved her before; that it reveals her secrets to us; and that after a careful study of Corot and Constab...

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The Picture of Dorian Gray, July 1890

By: Oscar Wilde ; edited by Alfred J. Drake

Victorian Literature

Excerpts: From the corner of the divan of Persian saddle-bags on which he was lying, smoking, as usual, innumerable cigarettes, Lord Henry Wotton could just catch the gleam of the honey-sweet and honey colored blossoms of the laburnum, whose tremulous branches seemed hardly able to bear the burden of a beauty so flame-like as theirs; and now and then the fantastic shadows of birds in flight flitted across the long tussore-silk curtains that were stretched in front of the...

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Pen, Pencil, And Poison : A Study

By: Oscar Wilde ; edited by Alfred J. Drake

Victorian Literature

Excerpts: IT has constantly been made a subject of reproach against artists and men of letters that they are lacking in wholeness and completeness of nature. As a rule this must necessarily be so. That very concentration of vision and intensity of purpose which is the characteristic of the artistic temperament is in itself a mode of limitation. To those who are preoccupied with the beauty of form nothing else seems of much importance. Yet there are many exceptions to thi...

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Shakespeare and Stage Costume

By: Oscar Wilde ; edited by Alfred J. Drake

Victorian Literature

Excerpts: IN many of the somewhat violent attacks which have recently been made on that splendor of mounting which now characterizes our Shakespearian revivals in England, it seems to have been tacitly assumed by the critics that Shakespeare himself was more or less indifferent to the costume of his actors, and that, could he see Mr. Irving?s production of his Much Ado about Nothing, or Mr. Wilson Barrett?s setting of his Hamlet, he would probably say that the play, and ...

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The True Function and Value of Criticism : With Some Remarks on th...

By: Oscar Wilde ; edited by Alfred J. Drake

Victorian Literature

Excerpts: He may be a skeptic like the gentle Sieur de Montaigne, or a saint like the bitter son of Monica, but, when he tells us his own secrets, he can always charm our ears to listening and our lips to silence. The mode of thought that Cardinal Newman represents?if that can be called a mode of thought which seeks to solve intellectual problems by a denial of the supremacy of the intellect?may not, cannot I think, survive. But the world will never weary of watching tha...

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Past and Present, 1843

By: Thomas Carlyle ; edited by Alfred J. Drake

Victorian Literature

Excerpts: THE condition of England, on which many pamphlets are now in the course of publication, and many thoughts unpublished are going on in every reflective head, is justly regarded as one of the most ominous, and withal one of the strangest, ever seen in this world. England is full of wealth, of multifarious produce, supply for human want in every kind, yet England is dying of inanition. With unabated bounty the land of England blooms and grows; waving with yellow h...

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Aesthetic Poetry : From Appreciations, 1889

By: Walter Horatio Pater ; edited by Alfred J. Drake

Victorian Literature

Excerpts: THE aesthetic? poetry is neither a mere reproduction of Greek or medieval poetry, nor only an idealization of modern life and sentiment. The atmosphere on which its effect depends belongs to no simple form of poetry, no actual form of life. Greek poetry, medieval or modern poetry, projects, above the realities of its time, a world in which the forms of things are transfigured. Of that transfigured world this new poetry takes possession, and sublimates be- yond ...

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Appreciations, With an Essay on Style, 1910

By: Walter Horatio Pater ; edited by Alfred J. Drake

Victorian Literature

Excerpts: SINCE all progress of mind consists for the most part in differentiation, in the resolution of an obscure and complex object into its component aspects, it is surely the stupidest of losses to confuse things which right reason has put asunder, to lose the sense of achieved distinctions, the distinction between poetry and prose, for instance, or, to speak more exactly, between the laws and characteristic excellences of verse and prose composition. On the other h...

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Giordano Bruno, 1889

By: Walter Horatio Pater ; edited by Alfred J. Drake

Victorian Literature

Excerpts: IT was on the afternoon of the Feast of Pentecost that news of the death of Charles the Ninth went abroad promptly. To his successor the day became a sweet one, to be noted unmistakably by various pious and other observances; and it was on a Whit-Sunday afternoon that curious Parisians had the opportunity of listening to one who, as if with some intentional new version of the sacred event then commemorated, had a great deal to say concerning the Spirit; above a...

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Marius the Epicurean : His Sensations and Ideas Volume I of Ii, 1910

By: Walter Horatio Pater ; edited by Alfred J. Drake

Victorian Literature

Excerpts: Something liturgical, with repetitions of a consecrated form of words, is traceable in one of his elegies, as part of the order of a birthday sacrifice. The hearth, from a spark of which, as one form of old legend related, the child Romulus had been miraculously born, was still indeed an altar; and the worthiest sacrifice to the gods the perfect physical sanity of the young men and women, which the scrupulous ways of that religion of the hearth had tended to ma...

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Marius the Epicurean : His Sensations and Ideas Volume II of Ii, 1911

By: Walter Horatio Pater ; edited by Alfred J. Drake

Victorian Literature

Excerpts: And the Stoic professor found the key to this problem in the purely aesthetic beauty of the old morality, as an element in things, fascinating to the imagination, to good taste in its most highly developed form, through association?a system or order, as a matter of fact, in possession, not only of the larger world, but of the rare minority of elite intelligences; from which, therefore, least of all would the sort of Epicurean he had in view endure to become, so...

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