World Library  


Add to Book Shelf
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Book

The Death of Olivier Becaille

By Zola, Émile

Click here to view

Book Id: WPLBN0000180439
Format Type: PDF eBook
File Size: 0.5 MB
Reproduction Date: 2005
Full Text

Title: The Death of Olivier Becaille  
Author: Zola, Émile
Volume:
Language: English
Subject: Literature, Literature & thought, Writing.
Collections: Classic Literature Collection
Historic
Publication Date:
Publisher: World Ebook Library

Citation

APA MLA Chicago

Zola, E. (n.d.). The Death of Olivier Becaille. Retrieved from http://www.worldebookfair.com/


Excerpt
Was this strange state of torpor, this immobility of the flesh, really death, although the functions of the intellect were not arrested? Was my soul only lingering for a brief space before it soared away forever? From my childhood upward I had been subject to hysterical attacks, and twice in early youth I had nearly succumbed to nervous fevers. By degrees all those who surrounded me had got accustomed to consider me an invalid and to see me sickly. So much so that I myself had forbidden my wife to call in a doctor when I had taken to my bed on the day of our arrival at the cheap lodginghouse of the Rue Dauphine in Paris. A little rest would soon set me right again; it was only the fatigue of the journey which had caused my intolerable weariness. And yet I was conscious of having felt singularly uneasy. We had left our province somewhat abruptly; we were very poor and had barely enough money to support ourselves till I drew my first month's salary in the office where I had obtained a situation. And now a sudden seizure was carrying me off! Was it really death? I had pictured to myself a darker night, a deeper silence. As a little child I had already felt afraid to die. Being weak and compassionately petted by everyone, I had concluded that I had not long to live, that I should soon be buried, and the thought of the cold earth filled me with a dread I could not master -- a dread which haunted me day and night. As I grew older the same terror pursued me. Sometimes, after long hours spent in reasoning with myself, I thought that I had conquered my fear. I reflected, After all, what does it matter? One dies and all is over. It is the common fate; nothing could be better or easier. I then prided myself on being able to look death boldly in the face, but suddenly a shiver froze my blood, and my dizzy anguish returned, as if a giant hand had swung me over a dark abyss. It was some vision of the earth returning and setting reason at naught. How often at night did I start up in bed, not knowing what cold breath had swept over my slumbers but clasping my despairing hands and moaning, Must I die? In those moments an icy horror would stop my pulses while an appalling vision of dissolution rose before me. It was with difficulty that I could get to sleep again. Indeed, sleep alarmed me; it so closely resembled death. If I closed my eyes they might never open again -- I might slumber on forever. I cannot tell if others have endured the same torture; I only know that my own life was made a torment by i asleep. You see, I am alive, and I love you....

Table of Contents
na

 

Click To View

Additional Books


  • Anna Karenina, Vol. 5 (by )
  • Anna Karenina, Vol. 1 (by )
  • A Propos de William Shakespeare (by )
  • Anna Karenina, Vol. 6 (by )
  • Actions and Reactions (by )
  • Tales of the Grotesque and Arabesque, Vo... (by )
  • Faust : Der Tragoedie Erster Teil (by )
  • The Deeds of God through the Franks (by )
  • Atlantis : The Antideluvian World (by )
  • Don Quixote (by )
  • The Strategy of Indirect Approach (by )
  • In the Days of the Comet (by )
Scroll Left
Scroll Right

 



Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from World eBook Fair are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.